The main purpose of the seminars is to organise academic workshops for the presentation and discussion of undergoing research from the members of the group, with special emphasis on its young researchers and PhD students. The activity is meant to be a space for meeting, stimulating and improving EU research while also training towards participation in the most important conferences at national (AECPA Spain), European (ECPR; UACES) and international (EUSA; APSA; IPSA) levels. A further benefit from the seminars also derives in the tutoring and advising on how to best disseminate their results in high-impact factor journals.

The EUGov Research Seminars are organised approximately once every three months. They are open to all professors, researchers and PhD students of Political Science department and beyond. At times, special experts or travelling researchers to UAB will also be invited to present their research on EU topics. The organisation of the Seminars also counts upon collaboration with the programme of seminars from the Political Science Department.

You can find a list below of previously organised seminars. We will also announce further meetings in our News section. Finally, if you were interested in participating and/or presenting your own research, please get in touch with us to discuss a possible intervention!

 

Seminar 3:

March 14, 2019. 12:00-14:00 h.
Faculty of Political Science and Sociology, Sala de Postgrau
Speaker: Dr. Javier Arregui (Jean Monnet Professor at UPF)

Below the Member States: A Comparative Study of Regional Compliance with EU Legislation 


Seminar 2: 

February 14, 2019. 13:00-14:00 h.
Faculty of Political Science and Sociology, Sala de Postgrau
Speaker: Francesco Camonita (PhD Student)

Going through the “proto-euroregional” stage: the case of the Sicily-Malta Cross-Border Region.

 

 


Seminar 1:

December 14, 2018. 11:00-13:00 h.
Faculty of Political Science and Sociology, Sala de Postgrau
Speaker: Andrea Lanaia (PhD Student)

Positive and Negative Integration in EU Electricity Policy Regulation: Expanding New Intergovernmentalism or Creeping Supranationalism?